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We are currently working on the website.  We may have closed on meetup, but our monthly meetings and presentations are still continuing.

Stay tuned!

 

 

I am in the process of revamping the website, so keep checking back for updates.

Novembers meeting is being held at the regular meeting place on November 23rd at 10:30.  This month’s meeting is being presented by Mike.  Mike’s presentation will include:

Discussion on Canning, Preserving, and Storage Philosophy.  This talk will provide an overview of the basics of hot water canning, pressure canning, mylar and 02 absorbers, dehydrating,  and will touch on other preservation or food storage methods. Tools and materials will be described along with a show and tell of example products,  thoughts on stocking supplies for canning, and time for sharing ideas and experiences. Information on additional resources will be provided.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact us.

 

 

This month we are having 3 presenters:

Presenter #1:  Is in the process of building some extensive First-Aid / EMT Style Emergency Kits for his car and home and he has generously offered to show us what he has done and to perhaps organize bulk purchases so we can all also make our own kits.

Presenter #2:  Is giving a short discussion on the infection fighter, colloidal silver, something we should all know about.

Presenter #3:   Will explain H202 therapy (Hydrogen Peroxide therapy) an absolute necessity for when TSHTF.

A lot of knowledge in one meeting.

 

Update:  July 2012: Judge Lawrence Katz ruled that Victor Alfieri is not guilty of violating a town law by keeping three hens on his property.  Here is the article by Dan Hubbard, my favorite reporter:  

http://wayne.patch.com/articles/judge-rules-chicken-owner-is-not-guilty  

 

Here’s the background on Victor’s story:

 

Victor Alfieri who is running a valiant campaign to get the town of Wayne, NJ to change their chicken law.  I live in Wayne and I am for this change.  Currently you have to own 2 acres to raise chickens, who can afford 2 acres in Wayne?  And where can you find 2 acres in Wayne to buy?  When I was growing up Wayne had plenty of farms, now we have ONE.  When the developers starting paying off the politicians the farms disappeared as did the majority of trees.

Victor has worked hard on his fight, I’m sure the council people thought he would go away, but he didn’t.  And now the movement is growing.  At the final vote for the change, after a year and a half of discussions the council people decided they needed to discuss it some more.  If I hadn’t been there I never would have believed their behavior.  Accusations were flying and they were acting worse than 3rd graders, I was embarrassed for our town.  These are the people that represent us?  Even one member of the council that had helped to make the revisions voted it down!  How incredible is that?  Well that debacle will just make the movement stronger.

Here is the Podcast location for Victor, he brings up a lot of good information:

www.thesurvivalpodcast.com   (Episode 883) Podcast Interview with Victor Alfieri on the Urban Homesteading Movement
With Jack from The Survival Podcast

Here is Victor’s website:
www.woodlotfarms.com

And here is Wayne’s proposed town ordinance that needs to go through:

The Planning Board will be recommending a change to the Township Council to permit chickens with the following standards:

For properties 10,000 square feet or greater but less than 2 acres. The keeping of no more than 4 chicken hens, provided that the following criteria are met:

(a) there shall be 2 square feet of coop area per chicken hen;
(b) coops shall be no closer than 10 feet to the rear property line;
(c) coops shall be no closer than 10 feet to the side property line;
(d) coops shall be located in a rear yard or a side yard; coops are not permitted in a front yard;
(e) there shall be provided a minimum 35 square feet of run area; Max 85 Sq. Ft.
(f) runs shall be located in a rear yard or a side yard; runs are not permitted in a front yard;
(g) roosters shall not be permitted;
(h) there shall be no breeding;
(i)  there shall be no slaughtering
(j) no selling of the eggs
(k) $25.00 yearly fee

An acre is 43,560 square feet.
10,000 square feet a little less
than a 1/4 acre.

 

 

Unless you have a fully stocked, fortified, easily defendable structure to bug out to within a reasonable distance to your current position, you’re in for a world of hurt. If you really think you are going to grab your BOB and relocate on foot to the mountains and live off the land, you’re fooling yourself and ignoring reality.

What kind of training do you have? Have you ever tried doing this before? Have you ever spent extended periods of time exposed to the elements…..negative 0 degree temperatures in the winter or 100+ degrees in the summer? How about getting rained on for days on end and all of your clothes and gear are soaked. What are you going to do? Start a fire with your soggy matches? Where is your food coming from after your three day supply of MRE’s run out. Are you suddenly going to discover your hunter/gatherer primitive skills? The answer is no. You will get hypothermia and possibly die or starve or eat the wrong thing and die horribly.

How about defense/offense? Is making a spear really going to help you when the other guy has a firearm? Is digging a pitfall really going to work or just expend valuable calories from your diet? What do you have to defend yourself? Do you know how to competently use what you have? How much ammo do you have? Can you even carry a reasonable amount of ammo with your food storage, medical gear, cold weather clothing and portable shelter?

Do you really believe your bug out buddies are going to abandon everything they have to come and find you? They won’t. The only person you can truly count on is yourself in a bug out situation.

Would you consider bugging out if you have a family with small children? I hope not for your kid’s sake. At times when you need extreme noise discipline, your young children will be unable to comply.

Even if I lived in NYC instead of a suburb, I believe bugging out might turn out to be a death sentence. NYC will be a lost cause with the amount to people inside it. They will quickly turn on themselves as regular public utilities shut down (electricity will shut off first plunging us into darkness, which will in turn shut down the pumps that create water pressure eliminating drinking water, cooking water and sanitation).

Did you even bother to think about the hundred’s of thousands of folks that think they will also bug out to the country? You will be in competition with them. I guarantee they will not be planning on banding together as opposed to what you think.

 

With permission, as posted by  Mike in our Northern New Jersey Preparedness Group at Meetup.com

 


Mike, from our Northern NJ Preparedness Group wrote the following post on that site and gave me permission to reprint it here:

I had a long conversation with a buddy of mine tonight over a large pot of venison stew. I was shocked that he was not practicing any long term food storage because he does not have the skills to do it. That motivated me to write this post after promising my buddy to teach him what I know about food storage.

Folks, do not waste your money buying prepackaged, bulk, long term food storage unless you have the money to burn and/or don’t have the time to spend on doing it yourself. For most of us though, I’m sure saving a lot of money would be a plus because that would allow us to spend the money saved on more supplies. Keep in mind, depending on future the skills you learn doing the preservation yourself may become invaluable.

Anyway, here’s my advice – buy and read a few books or spend some of your free time watching youtube videos on bulk food preservation. Learn about canning and dehydrating. Try to figure our what would work best for you. What are your needs, goals and fears for the future? Is your main plan to bug in or bug out? You’re probably thinking, “What do these things have to do with food preservation?”. But when you do your research everything will come together and make sense.

If you plan on rotating the food storage into your regular meals, canning is a great way to preserve many foods that you grow in your yard for several years or even longer depending on the storage conditions.
You can store meats for the same amount of time through pressure canning – only slightly more advanced but requiring a more expensive (pressure) canner. This is a great way to preserve large amounts of animal products purchased while on sale. Most canned foods can also be eaten safely out of the jar without heating or cooking (canned foods are fully cooked through the canning process).

If you are planning on bugging out and only have canned vegetables and meats – you may have a problem….Think about packing the heavy pint and quart sized glass jars. Think about the amount of space you have in your BOB or even your vehicle. Think about your physical ability to carry the heavy load and the small amount of meals relative to those heavy loads. If those jars don’t break, you may be able to carry enough to sustain yourself for several days to a week. If you had to feed a few other people, you would all be starving in several days.

So, maybe canned goods isn’t the best solution for bugging out. Or maybe you want to put a large amount of long term storable food in your basement and forget about it until the SHTF. Let’s consider dehydrated food. Because their bulk and weight have been greatly reduced through the dehydrating process, dehydrated foods are more compact and convenient for storing and require very little space. Quite simply, you can store more than twice the calories/meals in less than half the space and less than 1/3 the weight!

Dehydrated foods also offer quick mobility in the event of a bug out situation. For example, one case of regular canned food weighs approximately 24 pounds. The same item of dehydrated foods would weigh from 36 to 45 ounce. Dehydrated foods have approximately double the yield of regular canned foods even though their cost is much lower. And then there’s also those handy, stackable 1, 5 or 6 gallon food grade buckets which are easy to carry multiples of with their handles and light weight. If you couple the food grade buckets with mylar bags and oxygen absorbers, now you have a long term storable food (30+ years for long grain white rice, certain legumes, hard red wheat and others…) that is stackable, easily stored, carried and transported.

Keep in mind, in order to consume dehydrated foods like rice and legumes, they need to be rehydrated. That means you need a heat source, water and time. In a bug out situation, you may not be able to make a fire as you would give away your position easily. You may not have the time to prepare your meal as you need to keep on the move to get out of dodge and/or evade pursuers. You may not have the skills to make a fire on your own. Or all of your natural combustible material and your flint may be wet due to the weather.

So there you have it. Canning and dehydrating are two excellent forms of long term food storage. There are pluses and minuses to both depending on your financial situation, timeline, goals, plans of bugging in or bugging out, or tactical considerations. Do your research. The information is out there on the web for free but there is no substitution for having a hard copy in event of a grid down situation.

-Practicality trumps style and skill beat bulls@%t.-

Many thanks to Mike for the excellent advice.

 

 

 

Close up of one of the jets that flew over our home on Saturday.

This doesn’t really relate to prepping, but its something that really bothers me so I’m mentioning it anyway.  I’ve been noticing a lot of jets flying overhead lately that make lots of contrails.  This past weekend was the worst I’ve ever seen of this traffic.  They were leaving contrail X’s all over the sky.  It started out as a nice blue sky with no clouds but by the time they were done the “clouds” from their exhaust were all over. It bothered me so much I started filming them, and I had to drag my husband out to take a look.  He was disturbed by it also.  I then tried to call Channel 12 news… they said someone else had called about them too.  I even called Governor Christie’s office, which is always a waste of time, but I did it anyway, and as usual it was a waste of time talking to the guy that took the phone call.

You might be thinking “What does this have to do about Prepping?” I just feel that anything that might be causing a negative impact to our quality of live is something every Prepper needs to be aware of. I’ve read a lot of negative information on contrails and the guesses of what the government is doing.  I finally checked out a website called AirCrap.org  a website that addresses their concern about contrails.  They were the ones that suggested that I post it on YouTube and also to call the local tv stations.

Check out the AirCrap video and then check out the one I posted on YouTube (sorry about the ad I have on that one). I filmed this March 10th and 11th in Wayne.  As a matter of fact I started filming when I left the first North Jersey Prepping meeting that we had on Saturday (how ironic is that).  Luckily I had my camera with me. Then I was even more shocked the next day to see the same amount of activity in the sky.

Have you been seeing this activity where you live?

This is just some of the mess of X’s, they were everywhere in the sky.

And to think that earlier there were no “clouds” at all in the sky.

Keep an eye on your sky!


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